PU TAI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

TEACHER SU’s
SAT READING & WRITING

It might seem like a challenging test, but it’s all about developing good habits, recognizing what questions they’re giving you and moving on from there.

THIS WEEK’S HOMEWORK

I’ll update the homework for this week here. Be sure to check Every Friday Night

Friday Night, May 11th, 2018

  1. Essay Practice: Martin Luther King Jr.
  2. Essay Optional: Alexander the Great Christopher Hitchens Lovely Stones
  3. Practice everything you can. 

Friday Night, May 4th, 2018

  1. Essay Practice: Let there be Night essayPractice Essay 1Practice Essay 2,
  2. Optional: Practice Essay 3
  3. Optional: Do the extra after-class material located in the middle of this site when you have time.
  4. Good Luck on your tests, have fun at home.

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

  1. Do Writing Passages handouts. There are four handouts.
  2. Please study the Complete Guide to SAT Grammar Rules.
  3. Study Flocabulary Wordup Lists 4 and 5.

Thursday, April 11th, 2018

  1. Do Writing Passages handouts. Everyone has a copy. Please show your deduction process by putting an X on parts of answers that are clearly wrong. (Don Quixote, Women’s Ingenuity, Antarctic Treaty System in Need of Reform)
  2. Please study the Complete Guide to SAT Grammar Rules.
  3. Study Flocabulary Wordup Lists 2 and 3.

Thursday, March 22nd, 2018 (Good luck on your Midterms!)

  1. Do Writing Passages: Interning, A Sweet Discovery, The Novel.
  2. Get printouts of the Complete Guide to SAT Grammar Rules.
  3. Study Flocabulary Wordup Lists 2 (again) and 3.
  4. Do the extra after-class material located in the middle of this site.

Friday, March 17th, 2018

  1. Please do the six worksheets I gave you during class. They are Village Opera, Plant Fossils, Viking Longboats, Kennedy Speech, Sunspots, Dictionary. I’ll provide copies of them online tomorrow (March 18th, 2018) as I’m busy today. You should spend no more than 14 minutes doing each of them. Try to finish them in under 10 minutes.
  2. Study Flocabulary Wordup lists K, 1, and 2.
  3. Do the extra after-class material located in the middle of this site.

Friday, March 9th, 2018

  1. Please do the Meditation worksheet. Don’t forget to study mark your homework with the X’s and O’s over what you think is true and not.
  2. Please do the Three Men in a Boat worksheet. Don’t forget to study mark your homework with the X’s and O’s over what you think is true and not.
  3. Please do the Space Debris worksheet. Don’t forget to study mark your homework with the X’s and O’s over what you think is true and not.
  4. Extra: Begin marking words you don’t know in all worksheets as well as beginning your studies with the Word Up project. Start with the Kindergarten words and work your way up. This is to help improve your vocabulary.
  5. Extra: Review the quiz sheet 1 and quiz sheet 2 the last class.

WHAT TO DO AFTER CLASS

Practice and study on your own, or in groups. Make the best you can of yourself. Try the following tips:

SAT Grammar Booklet from Prepscholar

Begin studying the Complete Guide to the SAT Grammar from Prepscholar. It is the shortest guide that concisely tells you all the rules for the SAT Writing portion of the test. There are only 35 grammar rules that you need to remember for the SAT.

Listen to Podcasts

I strongly recommend podcasts to help improve your grammar skills and vocabulary. Begin with podcasts like 6 Minute Vocabulary, Extreme Vocabulary, and the All Ears English Podcast. This American Life, RadioLab, 99 percent Invisible are great choices for more advanced listeners. You can listen for free on Podbay.fm and Player.fm.
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Materials to read in under 3-4 minutes

Read 800-word articles and try to remember them in under 3-4 minutes. Retention is key. Start by trying the daily selected article at simple.wikipedia.org. Later on, start reading the daily SAT reading practice at Redmond Labs’ SAT Reading Dialy.

Invest your time

Spend at least 40 minutes every day practicing for your SAT test. Every day you should find articles to read, increase your vocabulary, and study your online grammar booklets. You can divide them into two 20 minute sessions.
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Increase your Vocabulary

If those words are hard and you can’t understand them, then its time to start with Vocabulary. Start with the Word Up Project’s word list from Kindergarten to 8th Grade.

Top scoring students will get a prize

Students that improve the most and students that are top will get prizes. If you’re going to give your best, then you deserve recognition.

TIP:

There can only be one right answer

Types of Wrong Answers
Let’s go over the four types of incorrect answer choices you might see on the test and how to spot them!

Type #1: Extra Information or Slightly Off
Be a sleuth for extra details in answer choices that aren’t backed up by the passage. Even one unsupported descriptive word can make an answer incorrect.

Sometimes, an answer will have two parts. If one part works and the other part doesn’t, you still need to eliminate it! Make sure you look at both parts of the answer carefully and cross it out if you think either part doesn’t fit.

Type #2: Opposite
Even if you don’t know the exact answer to the question, you will be able to tell if relationships in the passage were reversed. These answer choices can be tricky because if you’re reading quickly, you might not catch that things are in the wrong order. That’s why it’s so important to double check your answers!

Type #3: Irrelevant or Concept Jumble
Irrelevant answers can be tricky because they prey on students’ tendency to overthink the question and twist any choice into a plausible answer. If something seems unrelated to what you read, it’s wrong. Don’t doubt yourself!

Similar to these are concept jumble answer choices, which create weird amalgams of stuff you read in the passage but don’t actually say anything relevant to the question. Again, if you’re going too fast these can be a problem for you. Never choose an answer just because it contains key words.

Type #4: Plausible Interpretation
These ones can be tough to eliminate, especially if you’re used to viewing literature in the context of English classes where many interpretations are valid. Again, you should only rely on direct evidence to answer Reading questions.

Even if the answer seems like it could represent a valid perspective on the passage, if it isn’t supported directly by the text, you need to eliminate it.

TIP:

RECOGNIZE THE TYPES OF QUESTIONS IN reading

Big Picture / Main Point (11 questions / 21%): What is the overall purpose of the passage? Is it describing an issue or event? Is it trying to review, prove, contradict, or hypothesize?

Evidence Support (10 questions / 20%): These questions ask you to choose a line or series of lines that provide the best evidence to your answer to a previous question. Therefore, an evidence question could refer back to any of the question types mentioned above, with the exception of vocab-in-context. These evidence support questions often take the form, “Which choice provides the best evidence to the previous question?” While these questions can help you check your thinking, they may also contain a trap; if you answered wrong to the previous question, you’ll probably find that the mistake in your thinking has a corresponding answer in the evidence question.

Little Picture / Detail (7 questions / 13%): Detail questions will usually refer you to a specific line within the passage. They might ask what a sentence means or how it functions within the overall passage.

Inference (5 questions / 10%): These questions ask you to interpret the meaning of a line or two in the passage. Don’t worry, they won’t be too vague or open to interpretation, as there can only be one absolutely correct answer.

Vocabulary in Context (8 questions /15%): These questions usually also refer you to a specific line and ask how a word functions within a sentence. These words are often not too advanced; instead, they’re often common words that may have an unusual meaning based on context.

Function (5 questions / 10%): These questions often ask what a phrase, sentence, or paragraph is accomplishing within the context of the whole passage. This links to your understanding of the big picture / main point.

Author Technique (1 per test): What’s the author’s tone, style, or other technique in this passage? Paired passage questions often ask you to compare and contrast author techniques or opinions.

Data Analysis (5 questions/10%): These questions are entirely new and refer to graphs and charts. They may ask something like, “Which claim about traffic congestion is supported by the graph?” The hardest ones may combine with an inference question, like, “The author is least likely to support which interpretation of the data in this figure?”

Other tips:

1. Pay attention to details, be very specific with your answers because inference is very important for the test.

2. Learn to read the first and last paragraphs and the first and last sentences of each body paragraph so you’ll know the main idea and the author’s argument.

THE COLLEGE BOARD’S

SAT ENGLISH OVERVIEW

BY THE NUMBERS

The SAT Reading and Writing test has a few requirements. Here are the numbers:

MINUTES FOR TEST

BREAKS (WITH ESSAY)

READING PASSAGES

READING QUESTIONS

WRITING PASSAGES

WRITING QUESTIONS

ESSAY

WORDS NEEDED

BE CONFIDENT IN YOURSELF

The SAT test is difficult even for American students. But there are a few things that you can be confident in. Many Taiwanese students, with a little guidance, can do very well and improve greatly. By the start of the 3rd year in high school, many Taiwanese students can easily score in the high 600’s to near 800 in the mathematics section, leaving a lot more room for error in the English portion of the SAT. That said, many students from English speaking private schools score very well on the SAT Reading, Writing, easily scoring near 500 to 600. In the essay portions, using established systems, many students can expect to score above 6/6/6 even with decently passable English writing skills.

The first step is always to have a dream for yourself. Imagine where you’ll be after you graduate from Pu Tai Senior High School. I’ll help map out and guide you there.

HAVE A DREAM OF WHERE YOU WANT TO STUDY IN THE USA OR OVERSEAS. MAKE THAT YOUR LIFE MAP.

ASK ME FOR HELP IF YOU NEED IT. I'LL HELP YOU MAKE YOUR DREAM COME TRUE.

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